International Women’s Day 2022

Hi all! Just a quick entry to share with you a short story by Jamaica Kincaid on the occasion of International Women’s Day.

Girl

June 19, 1978
 

Wash the white clothes on Monday and put them on the stone heap; wash the color clothes on Tuesday and put them on the clothesline to dry; don’t walk bare-head in the hot sun; cook pumpkin fritters in very hot sweet oil; soak your little cloths right after you take them off; when buying cotton to make yourself a nice blouse, be sure that it doesn’t have gum in it, because that way it won’t hold up well after a wash; soak salt fish overnight before you cook it; is it true that you sing benna in Sunday school?; always eat your food in such a way that it won’t turn someone else’s stomach; on Sundays try to walk like a lady and not like the slut you are so bent on becoming; don’t sing benna in Sunday school; you mustn’t speak to wharf-rat boys, not even to give directions; don’t eat fruits on the street—flies will follow you; but I don’t sing benna on Sundays at all and never in Sunday school; this is how to sew on a button; this is how to make a buttonhole for the button you have just sewed on; this is how to hem a dress when you see the hem coming down and so to prevent yourself from looking like the slut I know you are so bent on becoming; this is how you iron your father’s khaki shirt so that it doesn’t have a crease; this is how you iron your father’s khaki pants so that they don’t have a crease; this is how you grow okra—far from the house, because okra tree harbors red ants; when you are growing dasheen, make sure it gets plenty of water or else it makes your throat itch when you are eating it; this is how you sweep a corner; this is how you sweep a whole house; this is how you sweep a yard; this is how you smile to someone you don’t like too much; this is how you smile to someone you don’t like at all; this is how you smile to someone you like completely; this is how you set a table for tea; this is how you set a table for dinner; this is how you set a table for dinner with an important guest; this is how you set a table for lunch; this is how you set a table for breakfast; this is how to behave in the presence of men who don’t know you very well, and this way they won’t recognize immediately the slut I have warned you against becoming; be sure to wash every day, even if it is with your own spit; don’t squat down to play marbles—you are not a boy, you know; don’t pick people’s flowers—you might catch something; don’t throw stones at blackbirds, because it might not be a blackbird at all; this is how to make a bread pudding; this is how to make doukona; this is how to make pepper pot; this is how to make a good medicine for a cold; this is how to make a good medicine to throw away a child before it even becomes a child; this is how to catch a fish; this is how to throw back a fish you don’t like, and that way something bad won’t fall on you; this is how to bully a man; this is how a man bullies you; this is how to love a man, and if this doesn’t work there are other ways, and if they don’t work don’t feel too bad about giving up; this is how to spit up in the air if you feel like it, and this is how to move quick so that it doesn’t fall on you; this is how to make ends meet; always squeeze bread to make sure it’s fresh; but what if the baker won’t let me feel the bread?; you mean to say that after all you are really going to be the kind of woman who the baker won’t let near the bread? ♦

The New Yorker

Click on the image below to check Harper Bazaar’s list of 20 Essential Feminist Books to Read for Women’s History Month.

Reading Club 2021-2022 Second Session

Dear clubbers, our second session will take place on Tuesday, 1 February. We’ll be discussing Danielle Evans’s short story «Boys Go to Jupiter»,  a story about friendship and grief that invites us to reflect on racial bias and its devastating impact on our present society. If you would like to join us, please fill in the form below:

https://forms.gle/bh53rfor3C8ySoDS9

We’ll be meeting in the school’s assembly room (Salón de actos) at 20:00. You can download the story below. We hope you like it!

Thanks for joining us!

Dear book lovers, thanks for joining us in our first session and sharing your thoughts. It was really interesting and we had a great time! If you would like to have a look at the presentation we used in the session, please click here.

 

Among other topics, we reflected on the fate of young migrants in search of a better future. Just a few days ago, tragedy hit again in the English Channel. Thirty migrants who were looking for new opportunities lost their lives. Sadly, we have become numb to this type of news. Ramon was lucky. He successfully escaped  poverty. However, anxiety and feelings of guilt about leaving his family and his roots made him feel miserable, lonely and isolated.

COMING SOON! Date and topic of our next reading club sesssion. Stay tuned 🙂

Meanwhile, enjoy this powerful, short poem by Indian-Canadian author Rupi Kaur:

Reading Club 2021-2022 First Session

Dear clubbers, we’re excited to announce that our first session will take place on Wednesday, 17 November. We’ll be discussing Silvia Moreno García’s short story «Lacrimosa», a hauntingly beautiful rewriting of La Llorona myth that raises questions of ethics and social justice. If you would like to join us, please fill in the form below:

https://forms.gle/Pym2pP7E1TtnoWKKA

We’ll be meeting in the school’s assembly room (Salón de actos) at 20:00. For reading and/or listening to the story, please click here.

 

Check the interactive infographic here.

lacrimosa-printable